WhatsApp Privacy Survey

Better World User Survey on WhatsApp Privacy Policy

by | Jan 29, 2021 | Policy, Privacy

Better World User Survey on WhatsApp's new privacy policy finds that 72% are open to switching to another viable messaging platform.
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Users vent out displeasure, want government to crack whip

WhatsApp Privacy Policy Survey Report

Survey and analysis by Deepak Kumar

There is a thin line that divides respect for privacy and intrusion of privacy. In the age of the digital, this line becomes wavy and fuzzy as well. For big internet companies, the user data that resides behind the line is a gold mine. The more they get of it, the richer they get.

The recent WhatsApp privacy policy changes are just about that. By gaining a right to use and share WhatsApp’s select user data with partners, Facebook aspires to gain an unsurmountable edge in the digital advertising world. It goes without saying that WhatsApp data can help reap rich ad dividends for parent company Facebook. Users are not pleased. In respose to the one-week-long Better World survey concluded recently, a majority of them (67%) want the government to step in some way, as discussed ahead in this report. Notably, these include Business WhatsApp users as well. In fact, by the time of writing this report, various leading media portals had reported that government had written to WhatsApp and asked the company to roll back the proposed privacy-policy changes.

It all started when WhatsApp started sending out notifications to its users to the effect that it had updated its privacy policy and the users could either accept the new policy or quit using WhatsApp by 8 February 2021. Meanwhile, while this report was underway, the deadline was extended by more than three months. Users now have to accept the new privacy policy by 15 May.

WhatsApp’s privacy-policy change and the aftermath

Users’ retort has indeed been quick, sharp, and massive. They poured out their disapprovals in words as well as in actions. Millions of users posted and tweeted their angst against the move and even signed up on alternative messaging apps such as Signal and Telegram. Tesla Founder Elon Musk’s two-word tweet, “Use Signal,” helped drive a switch from WhatsApp, particularly given his following of 41.5 million on Twitter.

The rush to leave WhatsApp was so high that servers of Signal were not able to take the load of new signups. At one point, Signal sent out a tweet, “Verification codes are currently delayed across several providers because so many new people are trying to join Signal right now…Hang in there.”

On 11 January 2021, Facebook’s shares declined 4.01% on a day when Nasdaq slipped just 1.55%. On 12 January, it further declined 2.24% on a day when Nasdaq rose 0.77%. On 14 January, it happened to be at the lowest in more than six months.

Better World ran a quick user survey, where 37% users said they considered the move a serious breach of their privacy, while 45% said they it was not good but they could live with it. Only around 18% said the change didn’t bother them at all. However, some of these 18% users were already using other messaging apps along with WhatsApp.

WhatsApp privacy policy-Graph1

What’s the big deal about privacy in the age of social media?

In the age of social media, many of us have become comfortable sharing our thoughts and views on Facebook. In fact, many people don’t mind sharing sensitive personal information such as location and travel plans not just with friends but also with public at large.

However, when it comes to WhatsApp, the behavior often changes. Many of the users’ chats are peer-to-peer in nature and may not be meant for public viewing or consumption. The same would apply to the other activities they perform on WhatsApp, whether today or in future. These would include the financial and transactional activities performed on the WhatsApp platform.

In a digital living environment, if a Facebook wall may be considered comprising areas of the lobby and the living room, WhatsApp will certainly be akin to the bedroom and beyond.

No wonder, the recent changes in WhatsApp’s privacy policy have created a din that Facebook could not see coming.

In the wake of the user backlash, WhatsApp had to get into a defensive mode, sending out clarifications and explanations. However, a damage had been done by then. In a first reaction, 17% users responded to the Better World survey said they were quitting/had quit WhatsApp for good, while 45% said they would accept the change but start exploring other or additional options. Interestingly, 12% said they were already using another social messaging app. However, a good 26% said they would accept the changes and keep using WhatsApp as before.

WhatsApp privacy policy-Graph2

The myth that users are unaware and don’t care for privacy is broken

Often, as an extension to the assumption that transparency is the hallmark of a digital age, it is argued that privacy is hardly a thing that users care about. The user backlash against WhatsApp’s privacy assumptions easily breaks that myth. It also reminds one of the “Free Basics” event a few years ago. Users had then considered it an attempt to compromise ‘net neutrality,’ and Facebook had to roll the offer back.

The promptness of users in defending their privacy and other rights can easily be evidenced by these two examples. The events also show that users are well aware of the repercussions of any policy change or a new offering in the internet world. This is echoed by this survey results, with 80% users stating they were aware that WhatsApp was changing its privacy policy, and would be sharing a range of user data with Facebook and Instagram platforms with effect from 8 February 2021 (now 15 May 2021). The remaining 20% users said they were not aware of such changes. It is likely that some of these users were yet to receive the notifications regarding policy change when they took this survey.

Further, around 47% of users said they understood the implications of WhatsApp’s new privacy policy for users reasonably well and another 18% said they understood it fully well. By contrast only 29% said they didn’t understand it well enough while another 6% said they didn’t understand it at all. Overall, this implies a high incidence of awareness around WhatsApp’s new privacy policy.

Notably, while the messages will remains end-to-end encrypted, the new policy means sharing a host of user-related information with Facebook and other third-party platforms. These include information about a user’s location, IP address, mobile operator, timezone, phone number, and receipt of a Facebook or WhatsApp account. Additionally, conversations associated with business accounts will now be shared with Facebook.

WhatsApp privacy policy-Graph3

The damage-control measures may be too little too late; more is needed

WhatsApp has issued a number of clarifications and explanations pertaining to the change. Those clarifications, however, have been far from satisfactory. Its parent company Facebook says the new policy changes are directed only at Business WhatsApp accounts and not the individual accounts. Also, it says only certain ad-related information will be shared with Facebook and other group companies.

However, on the actual Privacy Policy page, some of the statements may sound alarming to users. It states in one place, “We work with third-party service providers and other Facebook Companies to help us operate, provide, improve, understand, customize, support, and market our Services,” and adds, “When we share information with third-party service providers and other Facebook Companies in this capacity, we require them to use your information on our behalf in accordance with our instructions and terms.”

What if third-party service providers don’t follow the “instructions and terms,” as had happened when in 2018 Cambridge Analytica was found to have harvested data of 87 million users from Facebook in 2016 under the guise of a survey app? In September 2018, again, hackers were able to exploit an API vulnerability to gain access to data of around 50 million users. In September 2019, data of 419 million Facebook users, including names and phone numbers, was exposed online, said Techcrunch. Three months later, data of 267 million Facebook users was reported by Comparitech as being in the wild. In March 2020, Comparitech revised the number to 309 million after finding data of another 42 million residing on another server had been compromised as well.

Given Facebook’s not-so-stellar record in protecting user data from being exploited by threat actors, it may be concerning for users to let some of their WhatsApp data be mined by Facebook and other third-party service providers.

WhatsApp, on its Privacy Policy page, further adds, “When you or others use third-party services or other Facebook Company Products that are integrated with our Services, those third-party services may receive information about what you or others share with them.” “Please note that when you use third-party services or other Facebook Company Products, their own terms and privacy policies will govern your use of those services and products.”

WhatsApp is not clear what this amounts to when used in conjunction with the previous two statements. Does this mean that if WhatsApp users share certain information with Facebook or other third-party services integrated with WhatsApp, the privacy policies of those services take over and WhatsApp’s privacy policy loses jurisdiction?

It will help if WhatsApp addresses such concerns and questions in its Privacy Policy document.

Pavan DuggalPavan Duggal, Indian cyber law expert

“I’m surprised that WhatsApp has done this even though India is their largest market. Effectively this means that WhatsApp, apart from sharing personal data, also discloses your transaction-associated information, which means including your credit card number, your debit card number, and your bank details. At the same time, they will share the IP address of users. It’s a very perilous situation, especially in a country that lacks a strong legal ecosystem around cyber laws and data security. Such policy changes can upsurge the probabilities of misusing users’ data by anti-social elements.  I strongly believe that people should count on more secure platforms such as Signal and Telegram for their messaging needs now.”

Rajesh Agarwal, Head IT, Aamor Inox

“People are moving to Signal and Telegram, but they are also coming back to WhatsApp. I’ve been using Signal for some time, along with WhatsApp, and found it is not as mature as WhatsApp is. There are many missing aspects in Signal, like, the personal reply feature. I found even the deletion of chat a cumbersome process in Signal. I understand the privacy concerns, but that’s there across the app ecosystem, and here WhatsApp is at least telling users what it is sharing and what’s not. Most of the users are testing Telegram and Signal while keeping WhatsApp as a primary communication tool. It will be exciting to see if this behaviour fluctuates and WhatsApp could address some of the privacy concerns that users may have”

Shashwat DCShashwat DC, Communications & Engagement (Research) at Azim Premji University

“While WhatsApp may try to dispel all fears about privacy expounding that its messaging platform is end-to-end encrypted, in reality, Facebook seems to trying to seize a lot of personal data to earn from its advertising business. To avoid such instances and provide users much-needed control over their data, India needs to implement its data protection law just like Europe’s stringent GDPR at the earliest. The world’s largest democracy, with a burgeoning IT sector, cannot risk the privacy of its citizens.”

There is a need for stakeholders to establish certain minimum privacy-policy norms

The right to privacy has been recognized as a fundamental right emerging primarily from Article 21 of the Constitution of India. Article 21 pertains to protection of life and personal liberty, and states, “No person shall be deprived of his life or personal liberty except according to procedure established by law.” In August 2017, Government of India had set up a committee under the chairmanship of retired Justice BN Srikrishna to submit a report on data protection. The committee submitted its report in July 2018.

In its opening note, the report recognized that “the protection of personal data holds the key to empowerment, progress, and innovation.”

The Committee had noted that “any regime that is serious about safeguarding personal data of the individual must aspire to the common public good of both a free and fair digital economy.” “Freedom refers to enhancing the autonomy of the individuals with regard to their personal data in deciding its processing which would lead to an ease of flow of personal data,” it added.

Justice Srikrishna Committee had emphasized that processing (collection, recording, analysis, disclosure, etc.) of personal data should be done only for “clear, specific and lawful” purposes. Also, only that data which is necessary for such processing is to be collected from anyone.

Based on the recommendations of the committee, amounting to a draft Personal Data Protection bill prepared in 2018, a revised Personal Data Protection Bill was approved and placed in December 2019. A joint Parliamentary Committee (JPC) chaired by Meenakashi Lekhi and comprising 20 members from Lok Sabha and 10 members from Rajya Sabha was constituted to submit its report. The JPC had conducted more than 55 sittings in 2020. Oral evidences were heard by the JPC from various state as well as non-state actors including Amazon, Google, Facebook, Jio Platforms, Paytm, and Twitter, among others. The final report of the JPC is awaited.

 Despite the fact that right to privacy has been recognized as a fundamental constitutional right, experts have been of the opinion that a law on data protection should be dynamic and not statutory in nature. This is more so because as digital economy becomes more and more prevalent and mainstream, data itself becomes dynamic in nature.

Coming to data protection, it is important to first distinguish between stationary data and moving data. While it can be reasonably guaranteed to foolproof privacy and security of stationary data, it can get very hard to ensure privacy of moving data.

The velocity of a moving data can be lightning fast in today’s digital environments. So once a private data gets into a public domain, even the slightest lapse or gap at the end of a data custodian could be disastrous. The hacks and misuses listed out earlier in this report are a testimony to this assertion.

It is therefore critical that, as we progress further into the digital economy, we ought to remove all regulatory fuzziness and laxity on the privacy front. A majority of respondents to the Better World survey subscribe to this view, with 24% noting that the government should ask WhatsApp to roll back the changes and another 43% stating that there needs to be a more holistic regulation in place. However, 33% of the users said that it would be better to let users be the best judge, though less than 22% of these users said they were fully aware of the implications of WhatsApp’s new privacy policy as users. Of the remaining 78%, slightly more than 26% said as users they didn’t understand the implications of WhatsApp’s new privacy policy at all or well enough, though more than 54% of these users said they reasonably understood the implications if not fully well.

WhatsApp privacy policy-Graph4

The choice of alternative reinforces that privacy is the key concern

Signal, which is considered to be the most privacy-oriented messaging app (see Table), was the first choice of those users who said they will look for WhatsApp alternatives. In this case, respondents had the option of selecting one or more apps, including WhatsApp. Telegram, which is considered second-most privacy-friendly app, had the second highest user preference.

While 34% of the users voted for Telegram as a WhatsApp alternative (and in some cases, as a replacement), a good 24% voted for Signal also. A fair percentage of respondents (15%) said they were sticking with WhatsApp even though they were using or considering to use apps other than WhatsApp as well.

The immediate user response, as evidenced from the survey, has been quite aggressive. While 18% of respondents said they had already quit WhatsApp as the only app, another 25% said they planned to do so within a week’s time and yet another 29% said they planned to quit in a month’s time. However, 28% said they had no plans to quit WhatsApp.

FeaturesWhatsAppTelegramSignal
Subscribers (Global)2 billion400 million20 million
Cross platformYesYesYes
Video and voice callYesYesYes
End-to-end encryption Personal messages and calls are end-to-end encrypted.Only for secret chatAll features are end-to-end encrypted
Type of softwareClosed-source privacyOpen-source privacyOpen-source privacy
Information collectionUser’s location, IP address, mobile operator, timezone, phone number, and details of a Facebook or WhatsApp account.Device data, IP addresses for moderation, phone number and the User IDOnly phone number for registration
Group chatsUp to 256 membersUp to 200,000 members1,000 members
File sharing capabilityVideos with 16MB limit in size and regular files up to 100MB2 GB100 MB
Folder managementChats can be stored through emailChats can be moved in to foldersNo such feature exists with Signal
Disappearing messages featureEnables self-destruction of a message after 7 daysEnabled through self-destruct timerEnable self-destruction after 5 seconds to 7 days once a user read the message
Data backupYes, online and offline backup on google driveYes, on Telegram’s cloudNo, stored on its own cloud platform
Group chat securityE2ENoE2E
Cross platformYesYesYes
WhatsApp privacy policy-Graph5
WhatsApp privacy policy-Graph6

Analyst’s Views

Better World is of the view that while the responses to this survey do reflect users’ displeasure with the new privacy policy, the actual actions taken by them will likely be different in many cases. Particularly, those users who are considering to quit WhatsApp in a month’s time, are more likely to have second thoughts and may stay put. It is also likely that some of the users who have already quit may come back after some time.

The key reason for such reconsiderations would be the huge user base that WhatsApp currently enjoys. While WhatsApp had a colossal global base of 2 billion subscribers, Telegram has a much smaller base of 400 million and Signal has a miniscule base of 20 million by comparison. Even if a few million WhatsApp users move to other platforms, it will not be fruitful if a significant percentage of their contacts also move to those very platforms. If that doesn’t happen, users could feel compelled to come back to WhatsApp for their daily messaging needs.

Notably, when considering alternative apps, 26% said they were sticking with WhatsApp. Further, when asked to provide a timeline for quitting, 28% said they had no plans to quit. It is quite possible that when it comes to actually quitting the platform, a much higher number of users will reconsider.

A consolidated view of respondents’ profiles

WhatsApp privacy policy-Graph7

About the Analyst and the Survey Methodology

Deepak KumarDeepak Kumar

Deepak is an ICT industry analyst with more than 25 years of experience in researching and analyzing multiple domains. His focus areas are strategic business and marketing advisory, sales enablement, and public speaking.  He has published reports, whitepapers, case studies, and blogs in areas of cloud, mobility, social media, and analytics.

He is Founder and Chief Research Officer at BM Nxt and Better World. He has earlier worked with IDC, Reuters, Voice&Data, and Dataquest in leadership roles spanning research, advisory, and editorial functions. 

About the report

The Better World WhatsApp Privacy Policy Survey Report was prepared by analyzing results of a primary research and supplementing it with data and insights collected from secondary research.  

The Better World WhatsApp Privacy Policy Survey was conducted via an online form that was circulated among more 1,000 respondents.  A total of 565 valid responses were collected during the period 9 January to 25 January 2021.  Better World also spoke to multiple respondents for qualitative insights. The surveys were led by Jatinder Singh, Director, Research and Insights, Better World, and independent market researcher Deepti Arora.  

Acknowledgements

I take this opportunity to sincerely thank all the survey respondents for taking time out and providing their inputs, without which this report would not have been completed in a timely manner. 

MORE FROM BETTER WORLD

The growing web of digital payment frauds

The growing web of digital payment frauds

The rapid maturing of digital technologies and contactless payments have made lives of businesses and consumers easier. During the pandemic-stricken, confined ecosystem, enterprises quickly moved to digital and incorporated new digital payment and supply chain models. Consumers were also quick to shift to new behavior patterns and replaced in-store shopping with online shopping. Along with merchants and consumers, cybercriminals switched to new ways as well to expand their malevolent and fraud activities.

The upsurge in the online ecosystem is likely to create a brand new generation of digital customers in 2021. As digital experiences continue to become mainstream, cybercriminals are sensing an unprecedented opportunity to use new tricks and technologies to weave a deep fraud web around the gullible people and vulnerable IT networks.

Pandemic fueling fraud surge

By leveraging the latest technologies and network vulnerabilities, fraudsters explore new ways to target individuals and enterprises who lack adequate knowledge or cybersecurity tools to defend themselves.

Consider some statistics to understand the gravity of the situation: India witnessed over 2.9 lakhs cybersecurity incidents related to digital banking in 2020 (Source: CERT-In); a few months back, grocery delivery major Bigbasket faced a data breach, revealing data of 2 crores of its registered users; according to various industry reports, data breaches cost Indian firms Rs 15 crores yearly on average; FICO, a US analytics company revealed that four in five Asian banks are losing money to fraud as real-time payments rise.

The above data is just the tip of the iceberg. With the pandemic as a backdrop, digital payment frauds can upsurge even further.

Unified Payment Interface (UPI) emerged as one of the easiest ways to transfer money through Google Pay, Paytm, PhonePe, Freecharge, and others. This trend, however, also gave birth to various frauds associated with UPI payments.

The situation’s enormity can be fathomable as fraudsters didn’t even spare the Delhi chief minister’s daughter, as reported by various media outlets recently. She recently fell victim to an online payments scam while selling a piece of old furniture on an e-commerce platform. Last year, an Indian Air Force officer too fell prey to one such scam. The UPI-related frauds are even more concerning as India target massive uptake of digital transactions in the next few years, up from the current 46 billion.

There are also instances where users have fallen victim to fake shopping websites and transferring money by relying on unauthorized payment links received through SMS.

In one of the advisories issued in 2019, the Reserve Bank of India had warned all banks to take robust measures to prevent digital banking frauds that can wipe out the entire balance of a customer using UPI technology. With the more users connected to the mobile and the internet, such incidents are ordained to increase.

AI, ML, and user awareness

It is reasonable that most new customers moving to digital payments lack the knowledge and can be tricked by fraudsters to make security mistakes or provide sensitive information about their accounts. It becomes essential for enterprises and banks to take the necessary steps to combat digital payment frauds in such a scenario. (See: AI in banking now geared for a takeoff)

Enterprises and banks overhauling their payment and customer interface mechanisms by integrating digital pieces need to embed technologies such as machine learning and artificial intelligence to provide a secure and frictionless payment experience to customers.

By leveraging AI and ML algorithms’ competencies, the network can flag anomalies and derive a risk pattern, approving or declining a payment. In the year ahead, AI-enabled virtual chatbots will also play a pivotal role in enhancing user awareness and answer all payment-related queries. Enterprises are also testing predictive and prescriptive analysis to identify fraud in digital payment transactions.

There is a strong need for the industry to come together and make appropriate investments in next-generation security frameworks, real-time fraud monitoring solutions, and knowledge sharing programs to outsmart cybercriminals and strengthen consumers’ confidence in digital payments.

Digital transformation deals put IT sector back on track

Digital transformation deals put IT sector back on track

Buoyed by a rapid acceleration in digital transformation service deals, the Indian IT industry is back on the growth track, leaving behind the pandemic’s impact. In its strategic review 2021, titled ‘New World: The Future is Virtual,’ Nasscom estimated the IT industry to clock revenue of $194 billion in FY21, up from $190 billion a year back, registering a growth rate of 2.3% year-on-year. While the numbers may still be well-short of pre-pandemic 6-7% growth levels, Nasscom projections are really encouraging for one of the major industries in India.

The Indian IT industry is also likely to add over 138,000 new hires during the FY2020-21, taking the total employee base to 4.47 million. Much of this new workforce is expected to support the new-age technologies such as artificial intelligence, the internet of things, cloud analytics, automation, DevOps among others.

According to the Nasscom review, the indigenous domestic market, driven by hardware-led demand, continued to show resilience, growing at 3.4% in the year.

“As we look at 2021, while there are positives on the vaccination front and accelerated digitization across verticals, the technology industry in India is well geared to build on these trends and continue its transformation journey in this re-defined techad,” said Debjani Ghosh, President, NASSCOM.

The Indian IT industry is benefitting from the strong demand for digital transformation technology deals from Europe and Asia-Pacific (APAC). Sectors such as BFSI and healthcare are likely to continue to invest significantly in digital transformational technologies in the year ahead. (See: TCS finds its new growth mojo in DX)

A quantum leap for DX initiatives

Nasscom’s assessment is not surprising since the Indian IT industry has shown remarkable resilience in the last year and played a pivotal role in accelerating economic growth, enabling businesses to overcome supply and demand disruptions through digital transformation.

The disruption caused by the pandemic was terrifying for many enterprises as they were inexperienced in managing an upheaval of such magnitude. The crisis left them no option but to fast-track their digital transformation (DX) plans to meet the evolving market needs, interact with customers and employees. The immediate focus was to deploy technology solutions to enable the remote working for their workforce and increase business resiliency.

Indian IT services majors are also making continuous efforts to build new digital transformation capabilities in India and enhancing their focus on delivering more thoughtful, practical solutions to construct agile, integrated, simplified, and customized environments for their customers. This trend is likely to create further opportunities for IT firms to accelerate digital transformation deals in India and beyond through strategic mergers and acquisitions. Notably, in 2020 alone, the industry witnessed 146 M&A deals, 90% of which were digitally focused.

“Digital transformation is the topmost priority for global corporations, and in a highly connected world that will remain largely contactless for an extended period, there are shifts in business models, customer experience, operations, and employee experience. Our CEO survey for 2021 indicates that almost 70% of companies expect investment in global technology higher than the previous year. In this hyper-digital economy, trust with the four cornerstones of competence, reliability, integrity, and empathy will be the single-most-important currency, leading the industry growth towards a better normal,” says UB Pravin Rao, Chairman, NASSCOM in a media and analyst release.

Long-term impact

The impact of the crisis is going to be experienced for a long time. While the rapid vaccination program might pacify the COVID-19 effect by the end of 2021, the enterprise tech leaders in India will continue to rely on the cloud and AI-based contactless technologies to open their physical offices cautiously. (See: CIOs’ digital transformation focus accelerates recovery for IT firms)

Digital transformation in India and the global market will continue to see a significant focus in the year ahead as companies look to accelerate growth, innovate and compete at pre-Covid levels.

AI and ML adoption transforming recruitment workflows

AI and ML adoption transforming recruitment workflows

Megha Talpade (name changed), the talent acquisition leader of a leading organized retailer, is in a state of a quandary these days. Just like many other retailers, her company also faced hardships due to the pandemic that caused the shutdown of malls and shops for several months last year. However, as things are getting back to normal, Talpade has been assigned by the leadership to formulate a recruitment plan to expand the operations and sales team. As we continue through 2021, talent acquisition leaders like Talpade have no other option but to explore transforming the recruitment process through technologies such as AI and Blockchain to source the best talent in a cost-efficient way

What could have been a routine hiring exercise before the pandemic has suddenly looked like running a marathon! With the need for social distancing and safety likely to remain the top priority even in the waning pandemic scenario, shortlisting candidates through heaps of data and onboarding hundreds of new employees through traditional processes look like an inconceivable approach for talent heads. (See: How will AI impact enterprise ecosystems in 2021?)

Reimagining hiring experience through AI

AI is fast emerging as a top technology to transform the future of recruitment. AI-based screening tools empower companies to validate a specific number of criteria before sending the hiring managers’ selected profiles. Since the applications for a job have increased multifold after the pandemic triggered slowdown, it is no longer possible for companies to take the conventional route to shortlist candidates without a resume analysis tool.

Many companies are now looking forward to using AI to transform their recruitment processes and meet their hiring goals.

For instance, Vodafone started using AI to recruit call-center and sales staff in 2017 and has been pleased with the results. Similarly, Cathay Pacific, one of the world’s leading airlines, utilized AI-based platforms to reduce the hiring time for customer service and flight attendant roles from 3 months to 2-3 weeks.

By integrating AI-based analytical tools, talent acquisition teams can focus on the best candidates that match their core profile requirements. The algorithmic process can also scan candidates’ online behaviors by screening their publicly available comments and social media profiles and list the candidates as the top choice, recommended and not recommended at all.

AI tools can also analyze candidates’ facial movements, body language, and verbal skills through real-time AI scanning programs.

According to the 2019 State of Artificial Intelligence in Talent Acquisition report by Oracle, About 73% of organizations expect AI to increase recruitment speed, and 53% expect it to boost the overall productivity of the recruitment function. By 2022, the percentage is likely to go even higher.

In addition to screen the candidates, AI-based tools are also effective for conducting remote interviews through conversational chatbots or robots. Interactive chatbots can help businesses resolve candidates’ queries promptly and guide them with the onboarding and re-boarding process.

Credential verification through Blockchain

Blockchain technology enables hiring managers to access the complete and accurate employment history of a potential candidate. Leveraging its digital recordkeeping capability, Blockchain validates the CV of the jobseeker and removes any possibility of the candidate hiding an undesirable history. 

This means applicants cannot hide their professional historical data and credentials. It will give employers a better insight into their candidates’ natural strengths and weaknesses and assess them better for a given role.

The future will see a massive role of technology in recruitment cycles. Most of these technologies are governed by business logic, making it possible for enterprises to structure the patterns per specific inputs and solve many critical leadership hiring problems. While still at a nascent stage, 2021 is expected to see new use cases of Blockchain and likely play a key role to transform the recruitment processes.

Accelerating skills evaluation by leveraging AR and VR

These immersive technologies that were earlier restricted to the gaming industry can deliver substantial value in the new age recruitment process. By leveraging the advantage of AR and VR, companies can evaluate a candidate in an actual set-up, showcase their brand effectively and test the ability of a candidate to manage complex situations and analyze their resilience levels.

AR and VR can also make the entire recruitment cycle more engaging and exciting. For instance, Siemens was one of the first companies that started using AR and VR for driving recruitment almost a decade back. In 2011, the company had launched Plantville, an online gaming platform that simulates the experience of being a plant manager. Potential hires were given the challenge of maintaining a plant’s operation while strengthening the productivity, efficiency, sustainability, and overall facility health.

Since its launch, the game has helped Siemens build brand awareness, engage thousands of customers, and recruit several engineers.

While all these technologies hold great potential and are expected to play a pivotal role in mechanizing the top talent search and transforming the HR practices, they are yet to overcome obstacles like bias fully to make it wholly reliable. For instance, about three years ago, Amazon removed a secret AI recruiting tool from its hiring process that started to display prejudice against women candidates. For an enterprise looking at transforming its HR and recruitment practices, the best way is to identify your actual needs and partner with the right technology partner to harness the technology and increase the scope of hiring.

In adopting technologies like AI and Blockchain for talent acquisition, Talpade seems to have certainly taken note of this!

Tech Mahindra earns place in Forbes Blockchain 50

Tech Mahindra earns place in Forbes Blockchain 50

Digital transformation, consulting, and business re-engineering services and solutions provider Tech Mahindra has been featured in the 2021 Forbes Blockchain 50 companies list, a coveted global listing of pioneering companies, startups, and influencers in the distributed ledgers space. Tech Mahindra announced that it has been recognized for its transformative and innovative platform-based approach in Blockchain implementations for global clients. Its implementation of enabling 500 million mobile phone customers in India to manage their consent and preferences to avoid spam calls and text messages, was specifically highlighted. (See: Tech Mahindra gets new blockchain accreditation)

In 2019, Tech Mahindra introduced a Blockchain-based solution using Hyperledger, to manage unsolicited commercial calls (or “spam” calls) in compliance with the regulations and guidelines of the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI). Forbes recognized this project as unique in its scale as it remains one of the largest live ledger implementations in the world to date. In its analysis for Blockchain 50 2021, Forbes highlights that this recognition is an illustration of the trend of globalization of blockchain technology and its incipient rise in Asia, in particular.

 “We are delighted to be recognized by Forbes as one of the leading blockchain organizations of the world. Tech Mahindra is leveraging Blockchain to solve tough business problems and create a completely differentiated experience for end-users through a combination of best-in-class platforms, product innovation, and deep domain expertise. It is indeed a matter of great pride that we are the only Indian company and only IT and digital services consulting company to feature in the coveted list,” said Rajesh Dhuddu, Practice Leader in Blockchain and Cybersecurity, Tech Mahindra in an official release.

Tech Mahindra has been focusing extensively on Blockchain technology and testing its capabilities across a wide range of business verticals.

 The USD, 5.2 billion organization with around 122000 employees across 90 countries, Tech Mahindra, provides a holistic framework called ‘Block Ecosystem’ comprised of various levers: Block Studio, Block Engage, Block Talk, Block Geeks, Block Accelerate, Block Access, and Block Value, which can be used to create applications that unlock significant value for clients. 

For more details on the Forbes 50 Blockchain list and accompanying commentary, click here and here.

Three key drivers that will shape cloud ecosystems in 2021

Three key drivers that will shape cloud ecosystems in 2021

2020 was one of the most challenging years in recorded history. With many paradigm-shifting developments, the year upended the lives of almost every person on this planet. Amidst the changing times that even left many soothsayers speechless, technologies such as the cloud emerged as a silver lining and enabled businesses and economies to adapt to the new normal and survive.

Cloud, which is the pillar of the data-intensive tech ecosystem, played a pivotal role during the pandemic to navigate the change, enabling enterprises to build effective supply chains and setting-up robust remote working environments for their expanded workforce. It empowered businesses to deliver essential services during the lockdown and successfully proved the possibility of creating a more sustainable world.

In 2021, cloud computing is expected to make an even more profound impact as most businesses would focus their strategies to recover from the pandemic. Let’s look at some of the key cloud computing requirements that will impact organizations’ tech ecosystems in 2021. (See: A case for cloud-enabled COVID-19 sensors and loggers)

1. Focus on new use cases

In 2021, cloud computing is expected to make even deeper inroads into organizations as most businesses would focus on building strategies to recover from the pandemic. In general, companies are likely to increase their dedicated IT spending to the cloud, opening the market for more innovations and new growth models.

Most importantly, with technologies like 5G around the corner, cloud service providers will have a massive role in developing new use cases using complementary technologies such as artificial intelligence and automation.

The battle of supremacy between top cloud service providers such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud, and Alibaba is likely to become more intense in the year ahead.

Top cloud platforms — especially Amazon Web Service, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud — are expected to gain from this amplified focus. While AWS is likely to retain its supremacy, Microsoft, Google and Alibaba will continue to take aggressive steps to close the gap. To cater to the low-latency and high-redundancy capabilities required by several of these new applications, cloud service providers will look forward to adding intelligent edge capabilities in their solutions.

2. Hybrid and multi-cloud strategies to take center stage

As enterprises become more mature to understand the benefits of a strong cloud ecosystem, they also become more aware of adopting the multi-cloud approach to avoid the unnecessary risk of getting locked into certain vendors. And this cloud computing trend is likely to make a substantial impact in organizational tech ecosystems in 2021.

Kunwar Singh, Lead, Cloud Offerings portfolio across Microsoft Applications and Infrastructure Services, HCL, noted in an HCL blog post, “The hybrid cloud environment provides an essential blanket of security for mission-critical workloads, elasticity for delivery, and high performance to match the ever-growing need for constant innovation. To summarize, today, more than ever, hybrid cloud is an essential partner to businesses, as companies reposition themselves to maintain productivity, creating an efficient mobile workforce and staying poised to handle adversity.”

It is expected that organizations that plan to take a hybrid cloud route will focus on building an intelligent operative ecosystem to govern varied processes effectively.

3. More emphasis on governance and security

CIOs and technology leaders will continue to put more emphasis on deploying services without worrying about infrastructure overheads. Considering the continuous expansion of the distributed workforce, the industry will also focus on developing services and applications around network security, compliance, and privacy to secure sensitive data across the cloud ecosystem.

“For control, privacy, and regulatory concerns, private cloud has been leveraged to a greater degree as compared to public cloud services. From now on, the demand for public cloud services is also slated to rise along with a surge in private and hosted cloud models, ” says, Krishna Rao RV, Senior General Manager, IT AIG Hospitals.

While cloud security and governance will be a key focus area, it also remains one of the biggest challenges for organizations to expand their cloud programs. The industry is also battling with a massive shortage of IT Security professional talent and needs to find the best solution to resolve this issue. In the year ahead, there could be an upsurge of new talent programs and initiatives by the cloud computing providers to fortify necessary skill sets to drive further cloud adoption in enterprise tech ecosystems.

Mathan Babu Kasilingam joins Vodafone Idea as CISO

Mathan Babu Kasilingam joins Vodafone Idea as CISO

Mathan Babu Kasilingam

Indian telecom operator Vodafone Idea has appointed Mathan Babu Kasilingam as its new CISO and Data Privacy Officer. Kasilingam has joined the company in place of Amit Pradhan, who has recently quit the telecom operator to join Mandiant Consulting (Mandiant is a US-based firm that performs advanced cyber investigation, forensics, and incident response).

Kasilingam will be spearheading cybersecurity initiatives, digital security entities, data privacy compliance at Vodafone Idea in his new role. He will also have a huge responsibility to shoulder since data privacy and compliance has become a critical focus area for all the leading telcos.

This is the second technology leadership appointment that Vi has announced in the last four months. In November last year, the telco named Jagbir Singh as its new chief technology officer, following the exit of Vishant Vora. (See: Vishant Vora quits as CTO of Vodafone Idea).

Mathan Babu Kasilingam has over two decades of robust experience in the information security field. He has previously worked with companies such as the National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI), HDFC Bank, Symantec, Wipro Infotech, and BT Global Services in various security and data compliance domains. At NPCI, where he has worked for three years before moving to Vi, Kasilingam introduced several new initiatives and data protection practices.

Kasilingam holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering from Sri Sivasubramaniya Nadar (SSN) College of Engineering and is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional. In his free time, Kasilingam loves playing badminton and enjoys listening to music. 

About Vodafone Idea (Vi)

Vodafone Idea Limited is a pan-India integrated GSM operator, offering 2G, 4G, 4G+, VoLTE, and VoWiFi services. With a subscriber base of 290 million, Vi is India’s third-biggest mobile telecom operator and sixth-largest globally. Vodafone’s Indian arm and Idea Cellular had merged their operations in August 2018 in a highly competitive Indian telecommunication market.

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